15 September 2016

POSTS FOR BREAKFAST | 15.09.2016


Faith No More and related projects update.....


  • TeamRock
The A-Z Of Mike Patton. The Faith No More main man is a true one of a kind. Here's your essential guide…
The word ‘genius’ is overused in music journalism, wider writing and the world in general. When it comes to Mike Patton, however, there aren’t enough superlatives to describe the man. From rising to fame with Faith No More and subsequently splitting with the group in 1998, to pulling double duty with Mr. Bungle, working on film soundtracks, the Faith No More reunion and more, Patton has become a voyager of music. An explorer of the eclectic. No genre is left unspoiled; no hairdryer is safe (see J is for… Juice for clarification.) There’s no peg to hang this on nor upcoming release to sell with this feature. We’re just here to salute the solitary, maverick talent that is Mike Patton. Join us.
1989
THE RISE OF PATTON
Faith No More had caused a stir with their genre-blending sound and first major anthem We Care A Lot in 1985, but it was the replacing of singer Chuck Mosley with a young Californian chap called Mike Patton that proved to be their smartest move. The new lineup’s first album together, The Real Thing, ushered in a whole new era for heavy music, as songs like Epic and From Out Of Nowhere ditched the usual clichés in favour of a box-fresh amalgam of influences that pointed to countless future possibilities.




  • FACT mix 568: Mike Patton
...we just had to ask Patton for a FACT mix. And it shouldn’t be a surprise that the mix is a mad as a box of spanners, kicking off with the theme from South Park creators Matt Stone and Trey Parker’s Team America: World Police and ending on a classic cut from Nick Cave’s The Birthday Party. Patton calls this selection an “insomnia playlist” – too much ‘Caffeine’, maybe?
 

  • Tidal.com
FAITH NO MORE: 5 ALBUMS THAT CHANGED MY LIFE
Credited for inspiring the likes of Nirvana, Metallica and Guns N’ Roses, Faith No More is a keystone act if there ever was one. To mark the new reissues, we sat down with Faith No More’s Mike Bordin to talk about five albums that have shaped his life and music.
The Beatles: Rubber Soul 
This is my dad’s record! It’s a real transitional record for me; it took me from being a 7-year-old kid listening to Peter, Paul and Mary and “Puff the Magic Dragon” to “Tomorrow Never Knows” and “Norwegian Wood.” It was really life changing. 
Black Sabbath: Master of Reality 
Honesty it probably isn’t my favorite Sabbath record – but it’s one of the first I heard in its entirety. Tracks like “After Forever” are just so heavy. It’s dark, it’s thunderous. This wasn’t my parents’ music. This was mine! 
Charles Mingus: Oh Yeah 
I actually heard this early on, from a friend of [former FNM frontman] Chuck Mosley’s. It’s categorized as a jazz record, but really it was just a guy doing traditional music. It’s got real soul from its greasy and murky roots – it’s R&B, it’s gospel, it’s jazz, but it’s also a blues record. Really it got me into everything. 
Joe Jackson: Jumpin’ Jive 
Joe had some real well-made songs – and then right when he was at this peak of new wave and power pop, he just turned around and made this record of ’30s jump classics. He made a real statement with it – it look a lot of courage to do that. And this record really made me smile. It gave me joy. 
Killing Joke: Killing Joke 
I took some time away from the extreme aggression of metal for a couple of years, and got into a whole new kind of aggression in punk. I saw lots of similarities between this record and metal. It was like going back to something so ultra-aggressive, I wanted to emulate that power in the drums – and nothing personifies that power quite like Paul Ferguson. It changed everything for me.

  • Super fm 
A SuperFM À Conversa Com Billy Gould Dos Faith No More


  • Culture Creature 
Faith No More Stripped Down Their Sound on the 1995 Masterpiece ‘King for a Day, Fool for a Lifetime’
The story of 'King for a Day, Fool for a Lifetime' told by the band members themselves

“I had some riffs that I couldn’t do anything with on ‘The Gentle Art of Making Enemies', and Mike just took ‘em and went home and arranged the whole song! With a couple of my riffs and some of his riffs. He did it, like, overnight. He came back the next day and was like, ‘Look what I did with those riffs you had.’ And I was like, ‘Oh my god, that’s the song right there.’” - Bill Gould


  • Revolver 

Faith No More On Episode 28 Of The World's Loudest Podcast!

...we sit down with Faith No More's Roddy Bottum to discuss 'We Care A Lot,' Courtney Love, the early days with Chuck Mosley, being the accidental pioneers of nu metal, and much more.


  • TordenFilm
Look out, world! Our animated short film The Absence of Eddy Table will play Nordisk Panorama Film Festival 2016, Ottawa International Animation Festival (OIAF) and Fantastic Fest in the coming weeks! Directed by Rune Spaans, the film is based on the works of Dave Cooper who also wrote the script. Featuring voice work from Mike Patton and Ingrid Bolsø Berdal, and with an original score by Kaada. Check out the first teaser below!

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